Ethical Use of Technology in The Workplace

Vector of two managers with magnifying glass watching over at employee working at his desk on computer

Introduction

As a professional, you have a fiduciary duty to protect company assets and ensure that business activities are done in compliance with the law. This means that it is important to understand what constitutes ethical behavior in the workplace. Some of the most common unethical behaviors in the workplace include but are not limited to:

Respect privacy and confidentiality.

Privacy and confidentiality are most meaningful. Don’t violate the privacy of others, don’t share confidential information and don’t gossip about company issues. If you want to use technology for personal gain, make sure it doesn’t affect your work performance or negatively impact productivity at work.

According to a workplace study done by the Ethics and Compliance Office of Lockheed Martin, confidential information includes any sensitive, proprietary or personal data.

Confidential information is any information that is not public knowledge. This could include a trade secret, as well as personal data such as social security numbers and other financial information. The term “confidential” comes from the Latin word for “hidden” or “secret,” which gives us an idea of what types of things might be considered confidential.

Confidentiality laws exist to protect this type of information from being revealed without permission or authorization by either party involved in the exchange (the sender/recipient). In cases where there are no laws protecting employees’ privacy at work (or if they’re broken), companies may still have policies that prohibit sharing certain kinds of data outside company walls; these are called “employee handbooks.”

Consider the consequences of your actions.

  • Think about what could happen if you do something unethical.
  • Think about the consequences of your actions.
  • Think about how your actions could affect other people, not just yourself.
  • Consider how your actions could affect your company, even if it’s only to make things worse for yourself in the long run (for example: “I’ll get fired if I do this”).
  • Consider whether or not doing so will help or hurt your career and overall life satisfaction levels

Do not use company resources for personal gain.

  • Do not use company resources for personal gain.
  • This is a simple rule that should be adhered to by everyone in the workplace, regardless of their role or title. If you’re using your employer’s phone, computer and printer for personal reasons, it’s time to stop!

Be aware of the potential ethical issues of your actions.

When using technology in the workplace, it’s important to understand the ethical issues of your actions.

  • Don’t do anything that could get you into trouble. If you’re doing something illegal or unethical and it’s discovered, don’t lie about what happened in an attempt to cover up or justify your actions. They’ll probably find out anyway; lying won’t help anyone avoid getting caught.
  • Don’t do anything that could get your company into trouble either—and even more importantly: don’t take advantage of people who work for you! It might seem like fun at first but will only lead to resentment from employees who feel exploited and unappreciated by their superiors who want nothing more than for them to succeed at all costs (even if those costs include compromising ethical standards).

You don’t need to be outright malicious in order to violate such principles.

While the principles of ethical use of technology in the workplace are meant to protect your employees, you don’t need to be outright malicious in order to violate such principles. You can also accidentally violate them. For example, if you’re not thinking about the consequences of your actions or whether there are potential ethical issues with what you’re doing (e.g., using personal information from one person for another), then that’s a good way for you to do so accidentally!

You may even think “Oh well this isn’t so bad” when someone asks: “Is this okay?” And then they leave feeling like they’ve done something wrong—but really it wasn’t so bad at all because now they know how important it is not only keep track of who has access but also understand why we need those things (e.g., projects).

If you have questions about ethics in the workplace, ask management and human resources representatives for guidance.

If you have questions about ethics in the workplace, ask management and human resources representatives for guidance. They can help you understand what’s acceptable behavior and what isn’t, as well as provide guidance on how to resolve any issues that arise.

It’s important not to be afraid to ask questions when something doesn’t seem right or feels uncomfortable; if there’s a problem with your supervisor or co-worker’s behavior, don’t hesitate to bring it up! If there’s an obvious issue that needs addressing but no one wants to do anything about it yet—like someone taking credit for work done by another employee—then let them know how much trouble this is causing yourself (and everyone else) by speaking up now before things get worse down the road where more difficult decisions need making later on down the line due simply because nobody bothered telling anyone else first before making those kinds of decisions themselves without consulting anyone else first…

Unethical behavior can get both you and your company in trouble.

Unethical behavior can get both you and your company in trouble. It can lead to legal problems, damage your reputation, and even cost you your job. In addition to this, unethical behavior may also result in higher costs for the company because of fines levied by regulators or lawsuits filed by employees who feel they’ve been wronged by an employer.

The most important thing to remember is that there are no excuses for being unethical at work—it’s never acceptable! If you’re not sure what constitutes unethical behavior, ask yourself these questions: Are my actions aligned with my values? Does it make me feel good about myself when I do this? Am I hurting someone else (or ourselves) without reason?

Conclusion

We hope this post has helped you understand the importance of ethical behavior in the workplace. We’re all human, and we make mistakes – but it’s important to be aware of what those mistakes could mean for your career and reputation as an employee. Keep in mind that even if something isn’t illegal or immoral by itself, doing it may still result in legal action against you if other people find out about your actions.

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